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20120930
20121008
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in politicized religion. as i described in chapter seven, of religious cranks ceased to be a minor public nuisance in this country, beginning in the 1970s and grew into a major element of the republican rank-and-file. pat robinson's strong showing in the 1988 iowa presidential caucuses signal the gradual merger of politics and religion in the party. unfortunately, at that time i underestimated the implications of what i was seeing. it did strike me as oddly humorous that a fundamentalist staff member in a congressional office was going to take time off to convert the heathen increase, a country overwhelmingly christian for almost 2000 years. i recall another point in the early 1990s when a different fundamentalist gop staffer said that dinosaur fossils were a hoax. as the mayor of legislative mechanic toiling away what i hope to be a similar president ecclesiastical calling, i did not get cd ideological impulses far different from mine were poised to capture the party of lincoln. if the american people polled more like iranians or nigerians and europeans are canadians on questions of evol
for religion. right now as you may know, justice stevens retired two years ago as a protestant on the supreme court and we now have the supreme court of six catholics and three jews. how does that happen? in some ways you could suggest that it happens but it certainly reflects is we don't see that much anymore about the accounting by religion we still force are very aware of race and ethnicity and gender, so the fact that there are now three women on the court, you know, that says something. that's approaching a kind of normalization of the notion that the women can rise to the highest ranks in the legal profession. i think we're still waiting for more diversity in the court, and race and ethnicity. but the point i actually want to make the wingback to how the court knows what it knows is until elena kagan succeeded justice stevens two years ago she had never been a judge. she came from the dean's office at harvard law school. every member of the supreme court for the first time in our history had as the last thing on their resume a seat on the federal court of appeals, and that is astonishin
to ruthlessly to religion as well as to education and to politics. that's why president obama is not embarrassed to say as he says in the second book, the awe disty of hope, he believes in the living constitution. the phrase to a large extend the idea come from wilson. the term sounds so green, so natural, so organic like one of those environmental laws republicans are always opposing according to the democrats. that's a district misdestruction. the living constitution that president obama and wilson salute, the principle of the constitution is not natural selection but artificial selection. the theory or the reasons is we evolve to the point where question control our own evolution. we can take charge of society's development as a whole. the living constitutionist, as they both, i think, would describe it is a mandate for experts to take charge of government. to experiment on the sovereign people rather than simply represent them to build a new state and bread as a new people. it is constitutional you -- in which change is the law of life in all constitutions are supposed to be subject to darwi
myself. every man had his dope, whether it was religion, philosophy, creed, was the chemical faint -- cocaine, morphine, anything to take the weight of reality. and so we have a hero, intelligent, captivated, a renegade with little regard for right or privilege. to him the world was equally a moral above as well as the los of the progressive area reformer frederick hero. some might be squeamish about it in the criminal cases? in the course of that 60-year career he would tailor testimony, pay off witnesses and tracy tried for a jury bribing and both times barely escaped. do not the rich and powerful bribe jurors, you would as? did not intimidate and coerce judges? to the shrink from any weapons? get in -- compassion for those the faced loss or despair or persecution. a strong emotional nature doted by his upbringing. his father was a book living freethinking of their and owner of a royal furniture shop, abolitionist with steep values of liberty and equality. compassion plays a role of a unifying theory in his chaotic universe. the bids in his other office was built by overalls. poo
religions, the sense of tranquility is highly desirable. not anarchy, it is the way of the world and a healthy individual wants to see this. he is very tough-minded on the subject and i think illuminating. and he needs to sympathize with this need for wholeness. it is painful, it helps us understand why we, ourselves, and fellow citizens were fellow human beings might be drawn to the inebriation of this. i think they behave pretty well during this limit, but i want to end by saying that i accomplished working hard and playing a little bit. it was really something, you know, he never lost his wits. and he never got so much for a single visit. he never lost his way. that is something to admire. thank you. [applause] >> anyone who would like to ask a question or make a comment, and spontaneous postulation come into my life here. please step up to the microphone and talk away. >> i was curious about what you are saying about the stoicism, did he endorse that point of view in his writing? >> figure. >> he did endorse that kind of writing. florida is generally pessimistic. he believed
. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the world, we studied for what dr. martin luther king, jr. was all about and we were ready and we would be standing and at the theater were going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten. but we didn't strike back as a way of living in a way of life that is better to love than to hate. we wanted to build a love of community and be reconciled so this book is also about reconciliation to give you one example. i first came to washington, d.c. the first, 1961 to go on something called the freedom ride. 13 of us, seven white and 14 african-american. we came here on may 1st and studied and participated in non-violent workshops and i will lover frigate on the night of may 3rd someplace in downtown rest pete -- washington we went into a restaurant and i had never been to a chinese restaurant or had a meal at a chinese restaurant. that night we had a wonderful meal. the food was good, and someone said you should eat well because this might be like the last supper. the next day, may 4th, 1961, we left washington driven from here on our way to
regime which controls every aspect of their love -- lives even whether they are get to eat. religion is banned, there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment. punishment that it needed out to three generations of person's family. a political offender knows that with he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today, and more than a million perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this is and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans who have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best effort of the kim family regime to keep it secret. for more than fifty years, ever since the end of the korean war, they have within saled off from the world's eyes. the kim family regime pursued an eyelationist policy and mains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the gov
believe the only way you can get rowdy as the religion. rand was an atheist and one of the different answers to your question as to why she's such a polarizing character, she was an atheist and a time in american life when it was not good to be an atheist. if she were alive and writing waday nobody would care but she
religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985 in a memo plotting the litigation strategy of the solicitor general's office, he wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v wade? later that year of playing for a promotion, he wrote volume particularly proud of my contributions to the recent cases in which the government argued in the supreme court to the constitution doesn't protect the right to abortion, samuel alito. but, the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either and we saw that in the nomination to the supreme court. stuart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and he had made a campaign promise that jimmy carter didn't even make in the campaign. he said if i have the chance i will nomin
and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 1970 -- in 1985, a memo at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year, applying for a promotion he wrote i am particularly proud of my contribution to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, potter stewart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and reagan had made
the military people, they have a type of card you can imagine. did i ever say that religion matter? what color of the skin? are they male or female? are they muslims, christians -- nothing? imagine having that in your heart. that is what military people have. that is what your counterterrorism units have. because they are doing it every day, throwing themselves. [inaudible] i have so many patients now that i can hardly see them all. people can tell when you love them. when i was kicking out the door and swimming in the room, i left him with love. in closing, i want to leave you with an example of how i know love is missing. after i got divorced, i told myself i would never get married again. i would rather get shot three more times. i was a bachelor for a long time. god finally sent me the right one who convinced me that i could do something else with my life. i don't live in a bottle anymore. i don't have to take a ton of prescription medications anymore for pain. i have learned how to express myself besides just being on a team or having to do something illegal time. there's it is a lesson t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)